Hardware wallets

What is supported?

There are many distinctions to make here.

  • Does the vendor that makes a given hardware wallet support Bitcoin SV?
  • Does the vendor that makes a given hardware wallet support ElectrumSV?
  • Does ElectrumSV support a given hardware wallet?
  • Updates 1.6.2 for Trezor One and 2.0.7 for Trezor Model T only support “cash address” style address display. This is a useless Bitcoin Cash thing that is unusable on Bitcoin SV.
  • Updates 1.9.1 for Trezor One and 2.3.1 for Trezor Model T introduce incomprehensible technical error messages in certain circumstances that are hard to avoid unless you really know what you are doing.

Hardware wallets and BSV features

The way that hardware wallets work is that they generally verify the structure of the transaction they are being asked to sign, and act to prevent spending of coins in ways they do not understand. This means:

  • They may require that they have access to the transactions that provide the transaction outputs (aka UTXOs or coins) the hardware wallet is asked to sign off on the spending of.
  • If they allow the transaction being signed to have OP_RETURNoutputs it is the old form no longer supported on Bitcoin SV where OP_RETURN is the first opcode and the length of the output is limited to something like 130 bytes.
  • They only support P2SH for multi-signature payments. New P2SH outputs are no longer supported on Bitcoin SV after the Genesis upgrade, which means that multi-signature transactions cannot be done with the assistance and protection of hardware wallets.
  • They only support standard transaction scripts. This means that they can now only do simple payments, and this means P2PKH outputs.
  • Users may be asked to approve payments to addresses they do not recognise, and this is not necessarily evidence of an attack. It might be that we are making more than one piece of change and for some reason the hardware wallet only detects the first.

Summing up

ElectrumSV allows users to continue to use all four vendors hardware wallets, however the user needs to be technically capable and able to avoid potholes and even revert firmware. They can no longer do things they used to do, like be used for signing multi-signature transactions. None of the devices really support Bitcoin SV in any way that prevents incompatibility problems for a user, and the closest is Keepkey which just cosmetically shows the Bitcoin SV currency.

  • If someone asks you to pay an invoice and gets you to scan a QR code, you have no addresses to compare to the ones shown on your hardware wallet.
  • If someone gives you a Paymail address and asks you to send them some BSV, you have no address to compare to the one shown on your hardware wallet.
  • If someone sends you a STAS token the hardware wallet has no idea what to do with it. If someone sends you a Tokenized token the hardware wallet has no idea what to do with it.

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